Gallery Travels-British Museum

If you have the chance to visit London do yourself a huge favor and schedule at least two days at the British Museum. The museum has pieces from around the world including the Parthenon, where else can you find relics from the ancient world. I did not get the chance to see the Chinese section of the museum and hear it is extensive.

Founded in 1753, the British Museum is London’s largest and most visited museum. Its gigantic permanent collection includes over 8 million historical artifacts, with everything from Egyptian mummies to Roman treasures. Highlights include sculptures from the Parthenon, the Rosetta Stone, and the 12th-century Lewis chessmen.

The Basics Allow at least two hours for a British Museum tour, but don’t expect to see everything in one visit—it would take days to explore the entire museum and it’s easy to get lost. With so much to see, visiting with a tour guide is a convenient choice, and a small-group or private guided tour will ensure you maximize your time.  Things to Know Before You Go There is no admission fee for the British Museum, although donations are welcome.  Visitors are required to pass security checks to enter, and large bags and suitcases are prohibited. On-site facilities include museum shops, cafés, and restaurants. Free Wi-Fi is available throughout the museum. Audio guides are offered in several languages. The British Museum is fully wheelchair accessible.

Read more about The 10 Best British Museum Tours & Tickets 2019 – London | Viator – https://www.viator.com/London-attractions/British-Museum/d737-a1388?mcid=56757

The Museum’s collection online offers everyone unparalleled access to objects in the collection. This innovative database is one of the earliest and most extensive online museum search platforms in the world.

There are currently 2,335,338 records available, which represent more than 4,000,000 objects. 1,018,471 records have one or more images.

Marble relief, Slab II from the West Frieze of the Parthenon: two horsemen.

 

COMPASS Title: Ivory plaque depicting a winged sphinx

Free exhibitions and displays

Until 12 November 2019
Free

Special morning tours

Experience the Museum with a private morning tour

American Gothic

Guest Blogger

Artistcoveries

A few days ago I wrote a little history about Gothic architecture and art.  Today, I want to re-visit the Gothic world, but in a very different way, one that’s much closer to home.

We’ve all seen the painting:

medium_American_Gothic

It’s been called “…the most recognizable painting in 20th century American art”, referred to as “an indelible icon of Americana,” and without doubt it is Grant Wood’s most famous painting.

Despite having developed a familiarity with this most famous painting in my childhood, I never really did get to know much about its artist.

I think all I ever really did know about Grant Wood was that he was an American painter.

Wood was born in Iowa, which isn’t all that far from Missouri. It’s just north of our state, and I’ve traveled to — and through — Iowa many times.

He was an extremely active artist who worked in many…

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Thank You

 

This site was started as an outlet for me to learn more about art. I didn’t think anyone would follow, just me learning as I went along. Thank you for following, you are the icing on the cake and your comments are most appreciated.

Melinda

Day 2095 Crud that keeps giving —Guest Blogger Margaret McCarthy Hunt Art

Or is it just stopped up sinuses. Either way. Yucky. My bird drawing craze goes back at least six years or more. Some early ones. Parking lot seagulls probably in a Strathmore mixed media. I draw better birds now. All these were drawn while watching the birds. Chicken chasing Parrot rescue in Pigeon Forge Drawing […]

via Day 2095 Crud that keeps giving — Margaret McCarthy Hunt Art

Gallery Travels: The Musee d’Orsay

If you love the Impressionist period art, the d’Orsay has the largest collection of masterpieces in the world. It’s a travelers delight. The architecture of the building, an old train station, is worth the trip alone. The Left Bank has a completely different vibe than the Right Bank. The crowd is younger, it’s more affordable and less Rodeo Drive. I stayed in a small family run hotel, quaint, friendly and close to many attractions. Just blocks from Norte Dame, now sadly what’s left of Notre Dame.  

Melinda

 

The Musée d’Orsay (French pronunciation:  [myze dɔʁsɛ]) is a museum in Paris, France, on the Left Bank of the Seine. It is housed in the former Gare d’Orsay, a Beaux-Arts railway station built between 1898 and 1900. The museum holds mainly French art dating from 1848 to 1914, including paintings, sculptures, furniture, and photography. It houses the largest collection of impressionist and post-Impressionist masterpieces in the world, by painters including Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, Sisley, Gauguin, and Van Gogh. Many of these works were held at the Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume prior to the museum’s opening in 1986. It is one of the largest art museums in Europe. Musée d’Orsay had 3.177 million visitors in 2017.

     

The museum building was originally a railway station, Gare d’Orsay, constructed for the Chemin de Fer de Paris à Orléansand finished in time for the 1900 Exposition Universelle to the design of three architects: Lucien Magne, Émile Bénard and Victor Laloux. It was the terminus for the railways of southwestern France until 1939.

By 1939 the station’s short platforms had become unsuitable for the longer trains that had come to be used for mainline services. After 1939 it was used for suburban services and part of it became a mailing centre during World War II. It was then used as a set for several films, such as Kafka‘s The Trial adapted by Orson Welles, and as a haven for the RenaudBarrault Theatre Company and for auctioneers, while the Hôtel Drouot was being rebuilt.

In 1970, permission was granted to demolish the station but Jacques Duhamel, Minister for Cultural Affairs, ruled against plans to build a new hotel in its stead. The station was put on the supplementary list of Historic Monuments and finally listed in 1978. The suggestion to turn the station into a museum came from the Directorate of the Museum of France. The idea was to build a museum that would bridge the gap between the Louvre and the National Museum of Modern Art at the Georges Pompidou Centre. The plan was accepted by Georges Pompidou and a study was commissioned in 1974. In 1978, a competition was organized to design the new museum. ACT Architecture, a team of three young architects (Pierre Colboc, Renaud Bardon and Jean-Paul Philippon), were awarded the contract which involved creating 20,000 square metres (220,000 sq ft) of new floorspace on four floors. The construction work was carried out by Bouygues.[4] In 1981, the Italian architect Gae Aulenti was chosen to design the interior including the internal arrangement, decoration, furniture and fittings of the museum. Finally in July 1986, the museum was ready to receive its exhibits. It took 6 months to install the 2000 or so paintings, 600 sculptures and other works. The museum officially opened in December 1986 by then-president François Mitterrand.

Major Paintings

 

Day 281 Saved by a lab — Guest Blogger Margaret McCarthy Hunt Art

Van Goghs Blue church – Église Notre Dame de L’Assomption at Auvers-sur-Oise Getting near done. If you turn the corner to the left you will be at the Auberge Ravoux where he died. Maybe a block away. The lab was added because I knocked my metal Holbein palette from the table onto this painting after […]

via Day 281 Saved by a lab — Margaret McCarthy Hunt Art

My European Faces: Dr. Elena Keidosiute, a cultural attache, is Lithuanian & European

I love this face, be sure to check out all of her blog.

Arstyr

This is not a movie star, but a Lithuanian postdoctoral fellow

Dr. Elena Keidosiute is a cultural attache and postdoctoral fellow. She first studied in Lithuania and Great Britain, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at NYU about Jewish conversions to catholicism. In the meantime, she became a cultural attache for the Lithuanian Embassy in Tel Aviv and organized a music festival. She is Lithuanian & European.

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