Camille Pissarro​ One of My Favs

It is strange that most of Camille Pissarro’s artwork I don’t care for. Landscapes, people working in fields, there all very nice but don’t have as much interest as Boulivorde Martmontre Avenue at Night, 1897.

This piece draws me into all the different brush strokes, nothing clearly defined yet perfectly understand. I can feel the excitement of people bustling around on a brisk night. His use of reflections is the icing on the cake.

Thank you for coming by to see on my favorite Impressionist/Post Impressionist artist Camille Pissarro.

CAMILLE PISSARRO

(July 10, 1830 – November 13, 1903)

See the source image

Camille Pissarro (July 10, 1830 – November 13, 1903) was a French Impressionist painter. His importance resides not only in his visual contributions to Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, but also in his patriarchal standing among his colleagues, particularly Paul Cezanne and Paul Gauguin.

Jacob-Abraham-Camille Pissarro was born in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, to Abraham Gabriel Pissarro, a Portuguese Sephardic Jew, and Rachel Manzana-Pomie, from the Dominican Republic. Pissarro lived in St. Thomas until age 12, when he went to a boarding school in Paris. He returned to St. Thomas where he drew in his free time. Pissarro was attracted to political anarchy, an attraction that may have originated during his years in St. Thomas.

Masterpiece: Edouard Manet

To start the day with humor, I searched the WP feee photo library, here is Van Go. 

green and white volkswagen combi
Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

 It’s hard to pin down my top five favorite pieces of art, no doubt you feel the same. I do have two close to my heart and I’ll share one with you today. M


Edourardo Manet painted one of my favorites, His last work was called A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, which was displayed at the Salon, in 1882. She pulls me into the painting. The Barmaid is beautiful but the painting doesn’t give me the feeling of her posing.  

A Bar at the Folies-Bergere, 1882 by Edouard Manet

Prior to that year, he received a special award from the French Government, which was the Légion d’honneur. It was one of the highest form of recognition that he has received throughout his life. 

His last work was called A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, which was displayed at the Salon, in 1882. Prior to that year, he received a special award from the French Government, which was the Légion d’honneur. It was one of the highest form of recognition that he has received throughout his life.

The Folies-Bergère was one of the most elaborate variety-show venues in Paris, showcasing entertainment ranging from ballets to circus acts. Another attraction was the barmaids, who were assumed by many contemporary observers to be available as clandestine prostitutes. By depicting one of these women and her male customer on an imposing scale, Manet brazenly introduced a morally suspect, contemporary subject into the realm of high art. By treating the topic with deadpan seriousness and painterly brilliance, Manet staked his claim to be remembered as the heroic “painter of modern life” envisaged by critics like Charles Baudelaire.

Everything is mere appearance, the pleasures of a passing hour, a midsummer night’s dream. Only painting, the reflection of a reflection – but the reflection, too, of eternity – can record some of the glitter of this mirage.” – Édouard Manet