Gallery Travels: The Palace Versailles Château Rive Gauche

A short train ride outside of Paris you will find The Palace Versailles Chateau Rive Gauche. This is a must see, the experience is like no other. The museum compares to the top museums in Paris. The gardens are magnificent and perfectly manicured, beautiful waterfall statues are strategically placed. This is before you enter The Palace.  Enjoy!   Melinda

Discover the Estate

The Palace of Versailles, whose origins date back to the seventeenth century, was successively a hunting lodge, a seat of power and , from the nineteenth century , a museum. With the gardens and the Palaces of Trianon, the park of the Château de Versailles spreads over 800 hectares.

« It’s not a palace, it’s an entire city. Superb in its size, superb in its matter.»

– CHARLES PERRAULT, LE SIÈCLE DE LOUIS LE GRAND, 1687

With 60,000 artworks, collections of Versailles illustrate 5 centuries of French History. This set reflects the dual vocation of the Palace once inhabited by the sovereigns and then a museum dedicated “to all the glories of France” inaugurated by Louis-Philippe in 1837.

Water features of all kinds are an important part of French gardens, even more so than plant designs and groves. At Versailles, they include waterfalls in some of the groves, spurts of water in the fountains, and the calm surface of the water reflecting the sky and sun in the Water Parterre or the Grand Canal.

Visitors looking through the central window in the Hall of Mirrors will see the Grande Perspective stretching away towards the horizon from the Water Parterre. This unique east-west perspective originally dates from before the reign of Louis XIV, but it was developed and extended by the gardener André Le Nôtre, who widened the Royal Way and dug the Grand Canal.

In 1661 Louis XIV entrusted André Le Nôtre with the creation and renovation of the gardens of Versailles, which he considered just as important as the Palace. Work on the gardens was started at the same time as the work on the palace and lasted for 40 or so years. During this time André Le Nôtre collaborated with the likes of Jean-Baptiste Colbert, Superintendant of Buildings to the King from 1664 to 1683, who managed the project, and Charles Le Brun, who was made First Painter to the King in January 1664 and provided the drawings for a large number of the statues and fountains. Last but not least, each project was reviewed by the King himself, who was keen to see “every detail”. Not long after, the architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart, having been made First Architect to the King and Superintendant of Buildings, built the Orangery and simplified the outlines of the Park, in particular by modifying or opening up some of the groves.

These two large rectangular pools reflect the sun’s rays and light up the outside wall of the Hall of Mirrors. Le Nôtre considered light as an element of decoration in the same way as plant life, and his designs combined a harmonious balance of light and shade.

The Gallery of Great Battles is the largest room in the Palace (120 metres long and 13 metres wide). It covers almost the entire first floor of the South Wing. It was designed in 1833 and construction started the same year. It was solemnly inaugurated on 10 June 1837, constituting the highlight of the visit of the Museum of the History of France.

The Hall of Mirrors, the most famous room in the Palace, was built to replace a large terrace designed by the architect Louis Le Vau, which opened onto the garden. The terrace originally stood between the King’s Apartments to the north and the Queen’s to the south, but was awkward and above all exposed to bad weather, and it was not long before the decision was made to demolish it. Le Vau’s successor, Jules Hardouin-Mansart, produced a more suitable design that replaced the terrace with a large gallery. Work started in 1678 and ended in 1684.

 

This prestigious series of seven rooms were parade apartments, used for hosting the sovereign’s official acts. For this reason, it was bedecked with lavish Italian-style decoration, much admired by the king at the time, composed of marble panelling and painted ceilings. During the day, the State Apartments were open to all who wished to see the king and the royal family passing through on their way to the chapel. During the reign of Louis XIV, evening gatherings were held here several times a week.

 

Containing over 60,000 works, the collections of the Palace of Versailles span a very broad period. The collections reflect the dual identity of the Palace, as both a palace occupied by the kings of France and the royal court, and later a museum “dedicated to the glories of France,” inaugurated by Louis-Philippe in 1837.

The Musee’ d’Orsay​

Rebuilding Notre-Dame de Paris

 

The Musée d’Orsay wishes to express its deep sorrow at the tragedy that has struck Notre-Dame de Paris Cathedral.
We would also like to extend our gratitude to those men and women who fought to save this emblem of our capital and this monument that belongs to the heritage of humanity.

The President of the French Republic has announced the launch of a national and international public appeal to rebuild the cathedral.
In order to help raise money for this reconstruction, the Government has put in place a shared portal www.rebatirnotredame.gouv.fr that regroups four charitable establishments and foundations authorised to raise funds via donations:

The Centre des monuments nationaux
The Fondation Notre Dame / Avenir du Patrimoine à Paris
The Fondation du patrimoine
The Fondation de France

These structures work to collect as many donations as possible from France and abroad while honouring certain commitments: full payment of all funds raised, secure payment and guaranteed transparency regarding fund-raising procedures.

Day 2047 Some of my favorites —Guest Blogger Margaret McCarthy Hunt Art

From my Biking cruise from Paris to Normandy. First night on the Champs d’Elysses. Who doesn’t love the arc de Triomphe and a rainy night in Paris. All the variety of doors just fascinated me. I could have filled a book with doors and The amazing variety of lampposts. Drawing in the Louvre. Who knew […]

via Day 2047 Some of my favorites — Margaret McCarthy Hunt Art

Gallery Travels: Spain and The Prado

In 1988 I had an opportunity to travel to Madrid, Spain with a small group from a popular radio station. The morning DJ took the trip with us, to some it was like traveling with a celebrity. That would not be me. This was my first trip to Spain and sitting at the hotel was not my idea of fun.

I walked to Toledo, a famous city with the magnificent Castle of San Servando.

Castle of San Servando

Evidence exists of an ancient monastery attached to a basilica of the same name, possibly founded in the 7th century. In 1080, Cardinal Richard of St. Victor, a monk of the ancient Abbey of St. Victor in Marseille, was sent as the legate of Pope Gregory VII to the Council of Burgos held that year. One of his mandates was to ensure the adoption of the Roman Rite, replacing the ancient Mozarabic Rite used by the Christians of Iberia for centuries. He carried specific instructions for the restoration of San Servando and its adoption of Roman liturgical practice.[1]

As you cross the bridge over the Tagus River you can see where cannonballs hit the Huge gates and surrounding walls protecting the Castle.

See the source image

See the source image

 

The most famous museum in Madrid, Spain is the Prado. 

Eugenio Lucas Velázquez – The Second of May 1808

See the source image

Roger van der Wevden Descent from the Cross 

 

See the source image

 

Spain is known for many handmade collectibles. Ladro porcelain is exquisite and my journey to Toledo was a search for a special piece of Ladro for my grandmother. The delicate flowers blow my mind. How could any person’s hand create the delicate flowers?

 

Thank you for reading, I welcome all your comments.

Melinda

Gallery Travels: Maui 1997

I started scuba diving in 1987, it was difficult I’m claustrophobic taking extra classes to handle the thought of breathing underwater. I was fortunate to log over a hundred dives in ten years.

A panic attack while shore diving almost drowning two people, this was the start of my Maui vacation. This is not my idea of fun any time, it was scary. I kept taking off my face mask, not breathing thru the regulator and pushing my dive buddy under water. Once on land, I would not take off the wet suit, kept laying on the ground and would not get in the car. That was my last dive, devastating but if I can’t dive again there are so many great memories and photos.

The early evening was much better, walking thru the Gallery District, sampling the wine, talking to the artist. It was so relaxing as the sun fell. I started talking to a gallery owner about his most recent works of art. I followed him inside and saw THE painting was perfect, I could see eating at the table, drinking wine smelling the beautiful flowers. This was my first original painting and I love it as much today. Interestingly he is the nephew of Gene Stallings American Football player and coach.

 

“Two Plums” c1997  G1/399

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Find In Russian Street Art

As a child the thought of Russian children hating me and me hating them made no sense, we didn’t know each other. Around six years old I set a goal to see the world, little did I know how much money it took and the politics involved.

My girlfriends parents subscribed to National Geographic, this must have planted the seed to travel. Her parents kept years worth which kept me quite busy. I live in Texas, born is Big City Dallas however had not left the county. 

I saw animals unknown to me, people who lived very different. A women who didn’t wear bra, strange. I was a tomboy, never wore my shirt but the only thing on my chest were nibs. This was a very exciting time for me, learning about lands far way. 

Move forward to 2001, exactly 9/11/2001. I’m heading to door to catch airport shuttle, my Gamps called hysterical something about a plane. Ok, I’ll call from airport. Other passengers board the bus, more of the story comes clear. This was no Cessna Gramps was talking about. Somebody from the back asked “Who would do this to us?” Before I could help it Bin Ladin came out of mouth. What the hell did I know?

The airports were closed for ten days as we watch WWIII unfold. My plane left for Russia ten days later, numb feelings, suspicion towards everyone, what am I doing on a plane????? Plenty of Xanax were taken during that trip. 

I traveled to Russia alone, didn’t speak the language, didn’t know anyone and would not pay for a guide, learning is half the fun. This trip taught me more about human nature over ethnic background. Most women don’t travel alone in Russia, it was easy to see I was American. People from all over the world were coming up crying saying how sorry they were, hugging me. It was a unique moment frozen in time. 

Bringing home a piece of art is a must for me, cost is not the point. The feeling I get talking to artist about their work, information beyond art. Near The Church of Spilled Blood is where the street artist and gypsy’s gather. I saw this piece of art and had to check it out. Something drew me in, a beauty in her eyes. It’s a small piece about the size of a magazine. 

ART IS ART!

Melinda 

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Interview With Photographer/ Blogger Cindy Knoke

Cindy Knoke has traveled the world, to the most unusual off the beaten path places you can imagine. Her photography is a window to the world. I ask Cindy a few questions to learn her photography background and how she plans for the monumental trips.

At what age did you pick up your first camera? Did the world look different thru the lens?

My first camera was a silly Swinger Polaroid camera which I got at around age 6. It had a jingle associated with it which I loved and remember verbatim today, “Meet the Swinger. Polaroid Swinger. Only 19 dollars and 95! Swing it up. It says Yes! Take the shot. Rip it off.” This was the essence of my photographic knowledge!! Laughing……. Here’s the jingle starring Ali McGraw:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h7k2uwJmwxo

I had family members growing up who were talented photographers but I never even thought to be one of them and never had any cameras. In adulthood, my husband, Jim, was our photographer and had good cameras. I used to buy those throw away cheap plastic cameras at drugstores for trips since I liked taking different photos than he did.

When we retired, we started dedicated chunks of travel time. Jim looked at my photos from the cheap camera, compared them to his, said, that I had something “special,” and gave me his camera a Canon, and showed me the basics on how to work it. That was my introduction to photography and it has been a serious joy in my life ever since. Jim is the person who encouraged and guided me to it for which I remain very grateful. He still encourages me to this day. I am not a trained photographer by any means, definitely self-taught and a hobbyist, not a professional.

What type of camera and software do you use now? 

I use two cameras a Sony HX400 and a Sony RX10 V. I use the 400 the most due to its variable zoom up 1200mm equivalent. I also have a Sony underwater camera which I hopefully will have a chance to use during our upcoming trip to the Cook Islands.

What software package do you use for editing?

I use Sony Play Memories Home and Windows Photos.

You travel extensively, how do you plan for each trip?
Jim and I discuss, propose, and agree on where we want to go. We use the internet to do all the research and planning.I propose an itinerary and Jim tweaks it. I We devise the modes of transport together although Jim takes the principle role here. I book the accommodations and Jim books the transport. Half of the fun we have in traveling is in the planning. When we are not traveling, we are planning!

 

How do you get access to the amazing Cathedral’s and the intricacies of others visited. 

We use the internet extensively. We research online before we go, and while we are traveling.Whilst  traveling research for each specific locale is key to finding unusual places.  Blogs are excellent travel resources leading us to interesting out of the way places.  Travel is so much more  fun when you plan a trip according to your particular interests, and internet resources allow everyone to do this!

Thank you bloggers!! Your posts improve my travel, and my life too, of course! Bloggers Rock!

Cheers,

Cindy

You can’t miss Cindy’s blog cindyknoke.wordpress.com.  You won’t forget the great places she’s been.

Melinda